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Wattage vs Wire-awg

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Wattage vs Wire-awg

This question is answered

Ignore my attempt a pun in the subject please.

I'm looking at a reciever with stats such as this.
105 watts x 7 into 8 ohms at 0.07% THD

But I have 130W speakers.  Which at about 6 ohms, I can get 130W to them with this amp.  THEORETICALLY (Don't number crunch for me yet please)

So, check out this table.

Wire Size

4 ohm load

6 ohm load

8 ohm load

22 AWG

 

6 feet max

9 feet max

12 feet max

20 AWG

 

10 feet max

15 feet max

20 feet max

18 AWG

16 feet max

24 feet max

32 feet max

16 AWG

24 feet max

36 feet max

48 feet max

14 AWG

40 feet max

60 feet**

80 feet**

12 AWG

 

60 feet**

90 feet**

120  feet**

10 AWG

100 feet**

150 feet**

200 feet**


Using some logic here, I could make use of better wire...while not having to upgrade my reciever.  Is this actually, legitimately possible?  It all seems to work out mathematically, but heaven knows math and retail do not mix.  But could I just run a 6 ohm wire patterns for my speakers, and deiver a 130-135W load rather than the 105W @ 8 ohms?



[edited by: Salukiknight at 10:32 AM (GMT -5) on Fri, Feb 12 2010]
Verified Answer
  • A receiver rated at 105 watts per channel @ 8 ohms will do just fine with 8 ohm speakers rated at 130 watts.

    All speaker wire adds resistance to the speaker circuit. The shorter and heavier the wire, the less resistance is added. The less resistance the speaker wire adds, the less the voltage drops across the length of the wire, and the less effect the wire has on the output of the speaker (up to a point). The chart is meant as a recommendation for wire gauge over a certain length and given a certain load. No amount of wire, of any size, will lower the impedance load at the amplifiers because the wire is in series with the load.

    Hook everything up using decent wire of the proper gauge, keep the runs as short as reasonably possible (bi-wire or bi-amp if you have the option) and enjoy the show.

     

         RESIma

All Replies
  • A receiver rated at 105 watts per channel @ 8 ohms will do just fine with 8 ohm speakers rated at 130 watts.

    All speaker wire adds resistance to the speaker circuit. The shorter and heavier the wire, the less resistance is added. The less resistance the speaker wire adds, the less the voltage drops across the length of the wire, and the less effect the wire has on the output of the speaker (up to a point). The chart is meant as a recommendation for wire gauge over a certain length and given a certain load. No amount of wire, of any size, will lower the impedance load at the amplifiers because the wire is in series with the load.

    Hook everything up using decent wire of the proper gauge, keep the runs as short as reasonably possible (bi-wire or bi-amp if you have the option) and enjoy the show.

     

         RESIma