Can digital cameras do this yet???

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My business is crating items for shipment in homes and businesses. Throughout a typical day I could have 6 stops with 3-5 items to be crated at each stop. To document the existing damage before crating I take multiple pics of each item. At the end of the day I can have as many as 100 pics to sort through and try to attach to orders.

So the question is:

Does anyone make a digital camera yet that allows you to label/stamp each pic or series of pics while you take them. Like a date stamp option they all have but you get to choose what the label is.

Verified Answer
  • Scot,

    GPS might be your answer. With a GPS-enabled camera, images are stamped with a location, or "geotagged." Geotagged images will show you the location on a map where they were taken, so as long as your stops are at least 50 feet apart it should work. Right now, few cameras are GPS-enabled, but this is a growing trend. One camera that will do this now is the Nikon P6000. Look for many more cameras to do this soon, and I'm sure in a few years they'll all be able to do it. 

    Two upcoming Garmin handheld GPS models will feature a built-in camera. If the camera's any good, it could be a winner.

    If you're handy, here's a link to a site which shows you how to make one for a DSLR. Personally, I was lost at 4.7Kohm resistor, but your mileage may vary.

     

    - Zak

All Replies
  • Hello Scot,

    I'm afraid I have not yet come across a camera that has a feature that would do what you are after. The only thing I can think to do is to take a log separately as you take the shots, marking down which photo numbers (range) covers each crated scenario. For example, if you pick up item B for first stop of the day, and take 7 shots, log it as A=1-7. At the next stop, you crate item B and take 4 shots, log it as B=8-11, and so on.

    Not as good as some sort of instant digital marker would be, but will make things much easier at the end of the day.

    www.crutchfield.com/Malcolm
  • Why not take along a laptop or netbook and transfer the files from each job to individual folders as you go, clear the camera, and start fresh at the next job?

         RESIma

  • Scot,

    GPS might be your answer. With a GPS-enabled camera, images are stamped with a location, or "geotagged." Geotagged images will show you the location on a map where they were taken, so as long as your stops are at least 50 feet apart it should work. Right now, few cameras are GPS-enabled, but this is a growing trend. One camera that will do this now is the Nikon P6000. Look for many more cameras to do this soon, and I'm sure in a few years they'll all be able to do it. 

    Two upcoming Garmin handheld GPS models will feature a built-in camera. If the camera's any good, it could be a winner.

    If you're handy, here's a link to a site which shows you how to make one for a DSLR. Personally, I was lost at 4.7Kohm resistor, but your mileage may vary.

     

    - Zak

  • Thanks everyone.