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SLR!!! Suggestion Please

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SLR!!! Suggestion Please

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Hi there,

I am looking for a new SLR. I am interested in wildlife photography. However, i am very confused which SLR to buy. I want camera which can keep up with running animals. Also would like if it has higher zoom. I am liking Canon EOS Rebel T3i. I have read many review about it. Recently, i read that it not for sports or for moving objects. Please share your thoughts and recommendations. Thank you so much for your time.

 

Kur



[edited by: Kur at 11:40 AM (GMT -5) on Sun, Aug 21 2011]
Verified Answer
  • Hi, Kur. The lens you choose is more important than which SLR camera body you get. For wildlife photography, you need fast focus and a "long" lens, meaning a focal length of 200mm or more. The SLR camera body gives you fast focus - faster than the "hybrid" or "mirrorless" cameras that also take interchangeable lenses.

    The lens is the more important choice. Get the best one you can - the best "long" lenses have large maximum apertures like f/2.8. This will let in more light , meaning you can use higher shutter speeds to capture a galloping herd. These lenses also tend to have a switchable image stabilizer that keep your lens steady while you're panning a moving animal.

    The best lenses are expensive, though. If you're looking to start small, look at the various 75-300mm lenses with built-in image stabilization. They're good lenses, they just need a little more light (or higher ISO) than the more expensive models.

    As for camera bodies, the T3i is a great choice. It's fine for action or anything that moves; that's what SLRs are great at. Here's our video about the T3i: http://www.crutchfield.com/learn/video-canon-eos-rebel-t3i-digital-slr-camera.html

    Nikons are great, too. Canon and Nikon are the most popular because each has an extensive line of lenses available. Just make sure your camera body and lens are compatible with each other.

    I hope this helps...any questions, please ask.

     

All Replies
  • Hi, Kur. The lens you choose is more important than which SLR camera body you get. For wildlife photography, you need fast focus and a "long" lens, meaning a focal length of 200mm or more. The SLR camera body gives you fast focus - faster than the "hybrid" or "mirrorless" cameras that also take interchangeable lenses.

    The lens is the more important choice. Get the best one you can - the best "long" lenses have large maximum apertures like f/2.8. This will let in more light , meaning you can use higher shutter speeds to capture a galloping herd. These lenses also tend to have a switchable image stabilizer that keep your lens steady while you're panning a moving animal.

    The best lenses are expensive, though. If you're looking to start small, look at the various 75-300mm lenses with built-in image stabilization. They're good lenses, they just need a little more light (or higher ISO) than the more expensive models.

    As for camera bodies, the T3i is a great choice. It's fine for action or anything that moves; that's what SLRs are great at. Here's our video about the T3i: http://www.crutchfield.com/learn/video-canon-eos-rebel-t3i-digital-slr-camera.html

    Nikons are great, too. Canon and Nikon are the most popular because each has an extensive line of lenses available. Just make sure your camera body and lens are compatible with each other.

    I hope this helps...any questions, please ask.

     

  • I would start with the Lenses and work backwards.  This of lenses as an investment as they will work on your next DSLR where the DSRL Body is disposable after a few years.

    For fast running animals, I would highly recommend starting with a 70-200mm f/2.8 like the Nikon or the Canon.  I own the Nikon and it is a very fast and super accurate lens with the Nikon autofocus systems.  Cheaper lenses don't autofocus as fast resulting is lots of out of focus shots unless you set to Focus Priority, which will then result is less than the advertised Framerate.

    For wildlife I would also recommend a APS-C sized sensor as it will provide you with the same field of view as 105-300mm (Nikon) giving you extra "reach".  The D7000 is a wonderful camera with 16MP APS-C sensor that has a fantastic autofocus system.  This camera has been so popular that they are almost impossible to get your hands on (also the disasters in Asia over the past year haven't helped).

  • Hello Kur, what is your budget? That would be my 1st consideration.

  • Well Kur, now that I am a year late on this, how have you progressed?