2 ohm or 4 ohm

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If I am running infinity 6030CS and infinity ref 6502ix speakers with an alpine mrv f300 amp am I running at 2 or 4 ohm?

Verified Answer
  • Keep in mind that that is merely the DC impedance of the driver at rest. When you're playing music, the impedance of the speaker will change continuously and I'd be quite surprised if it ever got down below 4 ohms.

    All else being equal (only the slightly lower impedance being a difference), then yes, the front components would be perceived as slightly louder.

    The front speakers "probably are"  closer, so their sound should hit your ears first, but it's quite likely the rear speakers could play loud enough to pull the sound stage noticeably rearward. If you have a HU with time alignment, that can resolve the issue. If you don't have such, fading to the front can help, as can setting the gain slightly lower for the rear channels.

    As for the pair up, there's nothing wrong with it per se. Unless you play your system quite loud and really like to push the limits of your setup, then the 50+ RMS your amplifier is capable of will be more than plenty.

All Replies
  • If you have a digital multi-meter you can check the ohm reading on the voice coils. My Kappas are 2.3 ohms each. I have some reference series that are 3.5 ohms each. Some Infinity speakers are 2.7 ohms. They vary. Cruthchfield lists the 6030CS as 2 ohm and the 6502ix as 3 ohm.

    GLH Geeked

  • With the 6502ix in the rear will they be running louder then the fronts? would I want it set up like that? Wouldn't I want most of my sound coming front the front speakers,and would just adjusting the fader take care of this

  • My misunderstanding, if the 2ohm are up front( 6030's ) they would be louder. Correct?

  • One more quick question, do you think these 2 sets of speakers paired with the alpine amp is a good match?

  • Keep in mind that that is merely the DC impedance of the driver at rest. When you're playing music, the impedance of the speaker will change continuously and I'd be quite surprised if it ever got down below 4 ohms.

    All else being equal (only the slightly lower impedance being a difference), then yes, the front components would be perceived as slightly louder.

    The front speakers "probably are"  closer, so their sound should hit your ears first, but it's quite likely the rear speakers could play loud enough to pull the sound stage noticeably rearward. If you have a HU with time alignment, that can resolve the issue. If you don't have such, fading to the front can help, as can setting the gain slightly lower for the rear channels.

    As for the pair up, there's nothing wrong with it per se. Unless you play your system quite loud and really like to push the limits of your setup, then the 50+ RMS your amplifier is capable of will be more than plenty.