Free Shipping on Everything.
60-Day Money-Back Guarantee | Lifetime Tech Support

Need cooling set up for Onkyo TX-SR705?

Home Audio

Home  Audio
Share thoughts on audio components, whole-house systems, cables, and speakers

Need cooling set up for Onkyo TX-SR705?

  • Hi all,

    My Onkyo TX-SR705 is on its way and due to arrive first part of next week. I can hardly wait! I've been without music and sound for everything for almost two weeks and will have to wait until next weekend to hook up the receiver. (I hear it takes time and brainwork).

    My question is this: Anyone here have any ideas for an inexpensive, small but effective cooling set up for it? It will be house in an entertaninment center on a shelf that is open-back. I ask because I hear these little beasties run awfully hot. My 20 year old $130 Kenwood ran pretty warm, so I can only imagine what this thing will temp at.

    ~Anubis~

    PS. You know, they really ought to be calling these things Audio/Video Servers just based on what is inside them and how they work. I work in the computer industry and in reading up on these I realize there is everything but a hard-drive array in these things. Big Smile

    Onkyo SR705 Onkyo DX-C390 Sony PX-LS520 Kenwood KX-5530 Kenwood JL-690 main spkrs Polk CS-1 center spkr KLH 911B surround spkrs Sony SLV-N88 VCR Samsung LN40A530 Panamax 5300EX Denon 1940ci DVD plyr
  • Here is a pretty good thread with some ideas for fans Clicky

    Currently working on my MBA program.  I hope to return sometime in December 2010. 

  • I've recently ordered a 250mm fan to cool my computer cabinet.  Unfortunately it's DC powered, so I'll either string a power cord out of the computer or buy an AC to DC converter of the proper voltage.  I've found ONE for $15.

    I'm looking forward to it because it's only 19 dBA which is incredibly quiet, yet it pushes over 100 feet per minute. 

  • Is this for that 100CFM fan you were talking about?  If so, I can not wait to hear the results!  I'm thinking of getting one just to have near my equipment stand because it'll keep the dust from settling.

    Currently working on my MBA program.  I hope to return sometime in December 2010. 

  • No, it's an entirely different fan.  The one I linked to before was smaller, but plugged into a standard AC receptacle and (I think) had a temperature sensor.  This one is quite a bit larger (nearly 10") and is quieter but I'll have to figure out how to power the dang thing.  If it took AC power it would be perfect, but as I said for $15 that can be done.

    I'm just glad my wife didn't freak out when I told her I wanted to put a 10" fan on the side of our cabinet.  No one will see it unless their head is under the desk so she was cool with it.
    Huh?
     

  • "Cool" man. 

     

    I'm interested to hear your thoughts after you get the fan all hooked up. 

    Currently working on my MBA program.  I hope to return sometime in December 2010. 

  • Me too.  I'm hoping my wife won't freak out when I cut a nearly 10" hole in the side of the cabinet.  It's out of sight, but you know how wives get sometimes.  Tongue Tied
  • Hello Anubis:

    I've had a couple of Onkyos....they are excellent receivers, but indeed run hot

    I currently have the SR705 in a piece of furniture (sort of like a serving sideboard) that has a top that is only about 1" above the top of the SR705.  Like the SR504 that I had before, I keep it cool by using a simple 4.75" (120mm) DC computer fan that is mounted to a piece of angled aluminum.  The aluminum is fastened to the bottom of the tabletop via some strong hook & loop fastener (Velcro).  It blows air sideways (left to right) across the top vents of the SR705, keeping the receiver nicely cooled.

    I have the fan wired into a simple AC to DC voltage controller that I bought from an electronics supply store (they are a nationwide chain).  It has a selectable output.  I set it to around 6 volts DC..  Since the fan is a 12v computer fan, it thus spins at only about 1/2 speed, and makes almost no sound, even when the volume on the SR705 is muted. 

     I have the AC to DC supply plugged into the switched 1A AC recepticle on the back of the SR705.  So the fan will then only come on when I turn on the receiver, and goes off when the receiver is switched off.

     This arrangement works extremely well.  The receiver actually stays cooler than when I leave it sitting out in the open.  I used to also use this set up for my previous receiver, the SR504.

     Keep in mind that the SR705 also has some built-in cooling fans that blow up from the bottom through the internal heat sink fins.  So these internal fans push the heat out the top of the receiver, and then my external fan pushes the heat away from the top of the receiver.  My external fan is black, as is the alumimum bracket that I made to mount it under the cabinet top.  So it's barely visible from the front of the sideboard.

    Hope that you find this helpful.



    [edited by: yardman 49 at 3:41 PM (GMT -5) on Mon, May 05 2008] [edited by: yardman 49 at 12:41 AM (GMT -5) on Fri, May 02 2008] [edited by: yardman 49 at 12:40 AM (GMT -5) on Fri, May 02 2008] [edited by: yardman 49 at 12:26 AM (GMT -5) on Fri, May 02 2008]
  • Thanks Yardman.  What amperage are you feeding the fan?  Did you simply cut off the fan's power connector and the converter's plug and splice positive and negative?
  • JerSully:
    Thanks Yardman.  What amperage are you feeding the fan?  Did you simply cut off the fan's power connector and the converter's plug and splice positive and negative?

     Hello JerSully:

    The AC adapter outputs a maximum of 800mA, and a voltage range of 3 to 12 V DC. 

    Input power consumption is 22 watts at 120v AC; that calculates to a maximum AC load of just under 0.2A, well within the limit of the SR705's 1A switched outlet. 

    I'm using it to power a 12V DC fan, and have it set to output 6V, so the fan is running at about 1/2 speed.  I don't remember the fan CFM at full speed; but I know that I originally chose it because it was a quiet unit that also had a decent CFM.  At half speed it is barely audible when you are near the cabinet and the receiver is muted.

     I bought the AC adapter from RS.  You can also purchase various compatible plugs, to adapt it for differing uses.  I bought a two prong adapter that I soldered to the fan power lead.  I then encased the fan lead in black shrink wrap.  I keep the adapter in a cabinet area under the shelf that the receiver sits on.

    The whole setup was a very inexpensive, unobtrusive solution that works very well, considering that if I have the SR705 sitting out in the open with no external fan, it gets fairly warm (some would even say hot). But under the tabletop, with the fan running. it is just the slightest amount warmer than room temperature (if that).

    Best wishes,

    Frank

     



    [edited by: yardman 49 at 12:26 AM (GMT -5) on Sat, May 03 2008] [edited by: yardman 49 at 12:25 AM (GMT -5) on Sat, May 03 2008]
  • Hello Everybody.

    I have on order an Onkyo 805. I've read that it runs really hot and I'm gonna need a cooling solution. Firstly, I'll put it on the top platform of my eqipment stand so it will have unrestricted airflow from all directions exept underneath. Then, I'm going to find a way to have a small desk fan trained on it. I'll post the results.

    Mike19

  • Cool.  Let us know how it works out

    Currently working on my MBA program.  I hope to return sometime in December 2010. 

  • yardman 49:
    The AC adapter outputs a maximum of 800mA, and a voltage range of 3 to 12 V DC.
    That's a nice, elegant solution.  I've been looking at doing something similar very but my understanding (or lack) of electricity is slowing me down.  I was thinking that computer fans are 12V, 900mA and knew that the voltage could be lowered but wasn't sure about the amperage.

    Ideally for my project I'd like add a thermal switch of some sort so that the fan kicks on whenever the cabinet reaches a certain temperature.

    I've been in IT 15+ years and have always loved any sort of consumer electronics.  I really should pick up a basic electricity book.

  • JerSully:

    yardman 49:
    The AC adapter outputs a maximum of 800mA, and a voltage range of 3 to 12 V DC.
    That's a nice, elegant solution.  I've been looking at doing something similar very but my understanding (or lack) of electricity is slowing me down.  I was thinking that computer fans are 12V, 900mA and knew that the voltage could be lowered but wasn't sure about the amperage.

    Ideally for my project I'd like add a thermal switch of some sort so that the fan kicks on whenever the cabinet reaches a certain temperature.

    I've been in IT 15+ years and have always loved any sort of consumer electronics.  I really should pick up a basic electricity book.

    Hello JerSully:

    Personal PC 120mm cooling fans (4.75") draw around 0.3A at 12 volts.  Some can draw more if they are higher velocity/CFM.

    You can buy them with thermal sensors, which will vary the speed of the fan based upon the surrounding temperature.  But these may be only useful inside a computer case where air temperatures are usually higher than ambient. 

    You can also get some fans with built in manual speed controls (a little potentiometer that may be a separate dial or may be built into the fan assembly).  So an alternative for you would be to buy such a fan and then just get a straight 12V DC converter and plug it into the switched outlet.

     Just be certain to look for models that are quiet.  Many times "quiet" also means "slow", as the fans are designed to turn slower to create less noise.  But better quality models can be had that are fairly quiet and yet also have decent flow rates.  You can find such items on some of the popular Internet computer hardware sites.

    Best wishes, and let us know how things turn out.



    [edited by: yardman 49 at 4:01 PM (GMT -5) on Mon, May 05 2008]
  • I'm very familiar with the fans themselves, but I've always put case fans IN computer cases.  It's just the power that's confusing me.

    The fan I linked to earlier in this thread is what I've purchased (mine without LEDs.)  It's very quiet and moves a lot of air, but apparently does pull 0.9A.  I'll probably power the fan off an unused internal power lead snaked through an empty PCI slot.