Sirius home radio reception

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Sirius home radio reception

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Sold a bill of goods by Sirius radio regarding reception.  ADvised me to purchase an ECHO repeater so I could set up my antenna for optimal reception and then  use the radio and boombox I purchased from anyplace in my house.  Well, ECHO no longer makes the repeater  even though I was told to check back on Tuesdays when new shipments come in.  Obviously, they knew that this unit was no longer made and blew me off.  Hard to believe that in this world of technology that no one has invented a wireless antenna.  Any suggestions?  I want to use my sirius boombox/radio without wires in several outdoor/indoor rooms that are not able to receive a signal.  Help please...thank you!!!

Verified Answer
  • Mikeyman

    Hard to believe that in this world of technology that no one has invented a wireless antenna.

    What a concept...

    But seriously, all antennae are wireless. That's pretty much what antennae do. An antenna that makes a signal available in an area that would otherwise have no signal still requires a device with yet another antenna to receive that signal. That is how mobile communications is made available in tunnels, for example.

    Satellite signals are line-of-sight. So the positioning of the antenna is critical. The ECHO, as it's name suggests, used a properly located Sirius antenna to pick up the wireless signal from the satellite. It then converted the signal to 900MHz (able to pass through walls and floors to a certain extent) and retransmitted it so it could be picked up by yet another antenna connected to the Sirius receiver by a wire. My guess is that it either didn't work as advertised or it caused too much interference with other 900MHz devices.

    My suggestion would be to wait and see if they release a newer model of the ECHO or to try to find one used at an auction site.

    If you have a good coaxial infrastructure in your home, it is possible to place a satellite signal onto the coax, but there are limitations and impedance mismatch issues (50 ohm for satellite versus 75 ohm for CATV) that need to be addressed.

         RESIma

All Replies
  • Mikeyman

    Hard to believe that in this world of technology that no one has invented a wireless antenna.

    What a concept...

    But seriously, all antennae are wireless. That's pretty much what antennae do. An antenna that makes a signal available in an area that would otherwise have no signal still requires a device with yet another antenna to receive that signal. That is how mobile communications is made available in tunnels, for example.

    Satellite signals are line-of-sight. So the positioning of the antenna is critical. The ECHO, as it's name suggests, used a properly located Sirius antenna to pick up the wireless signal from the satellite. It then converted the signal to 900MHz (able to pass through walls and floors to a certain extent) and retransmitted it so it could be picked up by yet another antenna connected to the Sirius receiver by a wire. My guess is that it either didn't work as advertised or it caused too much interference with other 900MHz devices.

    My suggestion would be to wait and see if they release a newer model of the ECHO or to try to find one used at an auction site.

    If you have a good coaxial infrastructure in your home, it is possible to place a satellite signal onto the coax, but there are limitations and impedance mismatch issues (50 ohm for satellite versus 75 ohm for CATV) that need to be addressed.

         RESIma