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Next XBOX (XBOX 720?) rumors

TVs & Video Components

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Talk about TVs, Blu-ray players, and home theater systems

Next XBOX (XBOX 720?) rumors

  • Hello,

    I've been hearing rumors of the next xbox hardware and a certain troubling feature.

    Here is an article from IGN on the hardware specs released so far:

    "The next Xbox will ship to retailers in late October or early November of next year with six times the processing power of the Xbox 360, sources close to the project have told IGN.

    Following initial reports from tech blogs Fudzilla and SemiAccurate, our sources have confirmed that mass production of the system's GPU will indeed begin by the end of 2012 but will not, however, be based on AMD's 7000 series Southern Islands GPU. Instead, the processor will be derived from the 6000 series, which was introduced last year. More specifically, it will be akin to the Radeon HD 6670, which offers support for DirectX11, multidisplay output, 3D and 1080p HD output. The chip currently has a market price of upwards of $79."

    I don't see any solid info of a processor, only mixed stories of either an IBM made or AMD processor, 8 core.

    And now the troubling part. According to a few news sources, they are planning on preventing the use of Used Games by requiring a CD key, similar to PC games. Lets list the problems this could cause. I imagine you won't be able to rent games any longer. Does this put Gamefly out of business? Gamestop, and others, buy your used games for cash or trade in. You won't be able to do that anymore.

    We are a two XBOX console household, and I know a few who are, and more. It was never my intention to buy multiple copies of games for the household. Seems to me this would hurt their sales more than help.

     



    [edited by: Chilitech at 10:08 AM (GMT -5) on Wed, Feb 1 2012]
  • Wouldn't surprise me if they do this TBH. I think that this upcoming gen (XBox 720, PS4, Wii U) will be the last systems that even use a physical copy for games. Digital distribution is easier, cheaper, and faster (the cheaper part isn't passed onto the customers though Angry). Although I would think and hope that you could, if a code is needed to play a game, that Xbox and devs would allow you to possibly link Xbox live, PSN, etc. accounts between systems somehow so the code on one would be present on another. I honestly think it's kind of sad that devs and publishers are so greedy that they are forcing you to have an access code just to play the game online (or even to play the game at all on PC). Money is not lost to them by used game sales. The costs of making the games, publishing them, etc. is taken care of the first time the game is sold. I know EA said a while back the reason they charge you for an online pass is because they save your records on there servers and even when you get rid of the game your records/stats stay there and the cost is to provide upkeep/expansion of servers. I disagree with this though because they save  your stuff all to the same account for all of your games so BF3 and NCAA football game records are saved to the same profile so if I buy NCAA football 2012 new but get BF3 used they already store info on me so the cost is no different to them. When it comes to rental places I'm also sure something will be done for them, like assignment of temporary pass codes that could be deleted when a games returned. But like I said everything is going digital soon so then what will happen to rental places? I would think digital renting, like you see with movies, would be the solution. You could "check out" the game and it would cost maybe a couple of buck's a day and then when you "check it in" charges would cease. The other thing with games going digital is brick an mortal stores will cease to exist. I do hope however that when everything goes digital that Microsoft, Sony, and Nintendo will allow you to chose where you want to buy your content from. I would hate to see a monopoly where the only way to buy stuff is through Microsoft, Sony, or Nintendo. Monopolies are bad competition is good. 

    GMC Sonoma, JVC KD-A95BT, 2 Pioneer TS-D601P in doors, 2 Pioneer TS-G4644R in dash, 2 JL W3v2-D2 10 inch subs, Lightning Audio B4.250.2, Soundstream TX1.1300D

  • (I changed the post type to discussion)

    You are right that everything is going digital. I was at the store the other day and saw a bin of blue ray movies on sale. The thought passed my mind that not many people will continue to buy this movies, requiring yet another piece of hardware attached to your tv at home, when you can just get the digital copy. On my xbox alone I have, I think, 4 choices for renting the latest movies, plus netflix for the old stuff. I don't need a blue ray player or dvd.

    As for games though, the space requirements to download them would be huge. And streaming a game times everyone that is playing it in multiplayer mode seems much. The cd key idea needs to be looked into carefully, and hopefully offer something to the consumer instead of hurt.

  • Chilitech
    As for games though, the space requirements to download them would be huge. And streaming a game times everyone that is playing it in multiplayer mode seems much. The cd key idea needs to be looked into carefully, and hopefully offer something to the consumer instead of hurt.

    True but it's already done on PC and almost all sales are digital. Your just not going to be able to have every single game downloaded and installed at once which kind of stinks. Although you never know, when this comes around (I would expect a minimum of 10 years a max of 20) hard drive storage capacity will likely be around 5+ terabytes just as a standard (if compared to advances made over the last 10 years). The other solution is dual hard drives in systems. Streaming to of games will probably be far better in the future than now (it's already pretty good look at OnLive). Agreed on the CD key though. This is going to be a problem but the PC community has already dealt with it and is probably better for it. Most content is DRM free (digitally speaking) meaning if you pay for it and can then download and install it on as many PC's as you wish. This is mostly because the distributor stores all of your records and stats on their servers so the devs don't need to because you play under the same account (look at Steam for example). Don't quote me on this but I also think Steam does or is going to allow linking of accounts so if two people in the same household want to play the same game they can without having to pay for it twice (mostly for online gaming purposes).



    [edited by: BIG teddy at 10:35 AM (GMT -5) on Wed, Feb 1 2012]

    GMC Sonoma, JVC KD-A95BT, 2 Pioneer TS-D601P in doors, 2 Pioneer TS-G4644R in dash, 2 JL W3v2-D2 10 inch subs, Lightning Audio B4.250.2, Soundstream TX1.1300D

  • Thats probably what bugs me the most. Being forced to either play a game on one console. or purchase two copies (which I won't do). I pay MS for a family plan. You would figure they would allow me to play a purchased game on any console under the plan.

    As for the hardware, it doesn't sound as impressive as I pictured it would be. That video card, if true, sounds like something I would add to a pc just to play recent games. I expected a game console to blow me away with graphics power, after all thats why I bought it instead of upgrading a PC. Lets see what Sony does.

  • As a Playstation owner I would love to hear some specs but they keep saying no new system will be available for a couple of years (most likely after Wii U and Xbox 720 are released). The card Microsoft plans to use in their system will deliver great graphics compared to what you have now, but it won't be that way at first. It will take devs a few years to get use to the power and finding tricks to make the game look and run better. I mean lets face it I can build a PC that will run BF3 at full 1080P, 120 FPS, across 3 screens, and be able to record gameplay for whatever reason but the graphics card required to do that is gonna run me $500+. Consoles aim for effective components at a reasonable cost. No console gamer want's to pay $2000 to run games at there full potential. Sony proved that even $600 is even to much. Reasonable is around $400 and Microsoft has already stated that they want their next console to be cheaper than the one the current Xbox cost. Great idea for selling tons of system, bad for quality of games and potential for ingenuity that could come with better components. 

    GMC Sonoma, JVC KD-A95BT, 2 Pioneer TS-D601P in doors, 2 Pioneer TS-G4644R in dash, 2 JL W3v2-D2 10 inch subs, Lightning Audio B4.250.2, Soundstream TX1.1300D

  • Here's a video with some more insight to what we are discussing. I kind of almost agree with what is said which would change my previous opinion but oh well. I guess I'm easily swayed.

    GMC Sonoma, JVC KD-A95BT, 2 Pioneer TS-D601P in doors, 2 Pioneer TS-G4644R in dash, 2 JL W3v2-D2 10 inch subs, Lightning Audio B4.250.2, Soundstream TX1.1300D

  • lol

    Yeah he offers both sides of the argument. This decision is good for the manufacturer of the game, for now, but bad for the end user and retail store. I say for now because lets say I pay the $60 for a new game, I do so knowing that if I get tired of the old game or don't like it, I can trade it back in for some cash back. If used games aren't allowed, the game store will have no incentive to take the game back. Will stores get as many people buying a new game knowing they can't trade it back in? Maybe not. And the manufacturer might wind up losing sales in the long run. I would say keep the used copies, but make the retail store pay a yearly fee to the manufacturer as a license to sell used games. While they might not like the idea, they will still make profits while allowing the user to enjoy games at a discount. And, in my situation, not lock a game to a single console. My son trades games with other friends all the time. They let each other borrow games. Or they have a gaming party where they all bring games over. Those days are over I guess. I think this will hurt sales. PC gaming is looking attractive again.

  • Chilitech
    I would say keep the used copies, but make the retail store pay a yearly fee to the manufacturer as a license to sell used games.

    Not sure how to make this work - if the used copies can't be installed, there is no point selling them.  If they can be installed, how do you make E-bay and yard sales and friends trading games pay the license fee ...

    (I guess you could do something where the new copy installed for free and a used copy had to pay a $5 activation fee - but if the records weren't stored on the console manufacturer's servers, you will have some VERY upset users when their consoles die and they have to pay $5 x several hundreds to install "used" games that they paid full price for already).

    Anyone else have suggestions?

    2002 Ford Focus JVC KD-A815 Sony CDX-GT410u Sony XT-100HD HD Tuner Stock speakers, no amp, no subs

  • What I meant was cancel the idea of a CD key all together. Just charge the retail story yearly fees if they want to continue selling used games. That way they get some money out of the deal, and not just the retail store.  As for trading games or yard sales, I don't see why they would object to that. Shouldn't really be much of a big loss.

  • Chilitech
    Just charge the retail story yearly fees if they want to continue selling used games. That way they get some money out of the deal, and not just the retail store.

    Publisher and devs have tried this. Retailers say no and there's nothing you can do about it. Now publishers and devs are fighting back and basically saying you wanna bet. It sucks because the gamer's are the ones being screwed the most in all of this. No one cares if you let your buddy borrow a game to play but because retailers won't comply with anything the games industry offers as a solution they have to take it this far. Actually because a game is a software, and you are buying a license to use it you don't actually own it, technically your not allowed to resale it or let someone borrow it, just like computer programs. I kind of like the comparison TB (guy from the video) makes between the used car and a used game. When you buy a used car you expect to pay some extra cash to fix it up or what not. So why should buying a used game be any different? I think charging someone $5-10 for a new activation code is reasonable. If the retailer selling the game says they will just go ahead and pay the costs and can just get new codes to repackage with the game then cool otherwise make the person who buys it pay for it.

    TigerHeli when a console dies and you have to replace it I'm sure that the activation for any and all games would be linked to your account so when you get a new system you would just have to log into play it. Same thing with games on my PC. Everything I buy on Steam I can re-download and install because it's all linked to my account not my actually PC.

    GMC Sonoma, JVC KD-A95BT, 2 Pioneer TS-D601P in doors, 2 Pioneer TS-G4644R in dash, 2 JL W3v2-D2 10 inch subs, Lightning Audio B4.250.2, Soundstream TX1.1300D